The DMGD, Digital Model Region Healthcare Tripoint, is a research focus of the School of Life Sciences (LWF) at the University of Siegen.

It is responding to the challenges facing the health sector: Especially in rural areas, fewer and fewer general practitioners (GPs) are setting up practice. At the same time, the patient bases the existing practices have to care for are growing. Modern digital technologies may have the potential to ensure health care in the long term, even in rural areas, and can relieve the burden on staff as well as on stakeholders in the health system.

Read more about our concept of a digitally supported healthcare process, our projects in the region around Siegen, e. g. DataHealth, and the research group “Digital Practice”:

Completed and Ongoing Projects

The DMGD has already carried out different projects within the model region around Siegen. There are three already completed scientific studies (MeDiKus, NäPa, DigiDocs) and two ongoing studies (Telemed@ATN, Needs Assessment Neuwied). The project DataHealth has also already been completed and includes the technical conception, implementation and testing of vital data monitoring. Learn more about the project below. Several other studies and projects are in planning.

DigiDocs

Telemedicine, Consultation via Telephone/Video

City Lennestadt/Kirchhundem

NäPa

Delegation

District Altenkirchen

MeDiKuS

Intersectoral Communication

City Sundern

DataHealth

Monitoring of Vital Data

City Burbach

Telemed@ATN

Business Model, Public-Private-Partnership Concept

City Attendorn

Needs Assessment Neuwied

for the Project „MeineGesundheit – Digital.Nah.Neuwied“

District Neuwied

DigiDocs

Telemedicine, Consultation via Telephone/Video

City Lennestadt/Kirchhundem

NäPa

Delegation

District Altenkirchen

MeDiKuS

Intersectoral Communication

City Sundern

DataHealth

Monitoring of Vital Data

City Burbach

Telemed@ATN

Business Model, Public-Private-Partnership Concept

City Attendorn

Needs Assessment Neuwied

for the Project „MeineGesundheit – Digital.Nah.Neuwied“

District Neuwied

Redesigning Healthcare Processes

Medical prescription of vital data measurement

Depending on the indication and illness history of each individual patient, doctors can specify which vital signs should be measured and how often.

Measuring of vital data

The patients record the vital signs on their own according to the doctor’s prescription. This is the elementary step of the new healthcare process with digital support. The monitoring of vital data has already been tested in the „DataHealth“ project. More information below.

AI-driven data analysis

The recorded data is automatically transferred to a cloud via a mobile device. There, an algorithm-based processing, i.e. pre-evaluation, will take place. The interpretation of the data and the derivation of possible medical measures should remain the responsibility of the doctors (see next step).

Vital data reception and evaluation

After receiving the data, the doctors can access and evaluate the vital data at any time via the web interface.

Feedback based on vital data

During a consultation (via video/telephone or in person), the doctor discusses the results derived from the vital data monitoring, such as medication, further examinations etc.

Digital Practice

The research group “Digital Practice” was founded by the DMGD to form the framework for cooperations between researchers from the University of Siegen and other national and international universities. The scientists involved work together in interdisciplinary units to evaluate the concept and develop it further.

UNIT 1 – ADVANCED MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY

Prof. Dr. Rainer Brück, Dr.-Ing. Kai Hahn

Vital data acquisition forms the patient’s front-end, where vital signs will be monitored using advanced measurement technology like sensing devices. The objective will be to perform measurement at patient’s home and to deliver the data automatically to a processing environment that is accessible by the doctor.

UNIT 2 – SMART INFRASTRUCTURE

Dr. Christian Weber

AI-enabled medical data processing will analyze the patient’s data and carry out a pre-assessment for the doctor by e. g. putting the data in relation to large amounts of already existing data in order to support the physician’s findings and diagnosis for an optimum treatment. This will save cost and effort while being less error prone at the same time.

UNIT 3 – MULTILATERAL BENEFITS

Prof. Dr. Simon Forstmeier, Dr. Thomas Neumann

Final data assessment and feedback to the patient is matter of the doctor. This research field is quite important as it includes all aspects of acceptance for physicians who must have an easy access to the processed data as well as for patients who must experience the added-values of e. g. home monitored vital data in their relation to the doctor.

Project DataHealth

The “DataHealth” approach is currently a novelty in Germany: The digital self-measurement of patients as an intersectoral support for the healthcare system has not been put into practice yet. Within the framework of the recently completed project “DataHealth” in cooperation with two medical practices and a nursing facility, vital data were collected from a total of 40 patients.

The general practitioners prescribed individual sets of vital signs to measure for each patient like blood pressure, oxygen saturation, heart rate, blood glucose, weight and ECG. These vital signs had to be measured regularly by the patients themselves or with the help of care staff or family members. The data were sent to a smartphone app via Bluetooth and were transferred to a medically certified cloud server. This whole process was fully automated. The GPs had access via a web interface to view and evaluate the data in real time.

For the physicians as well as for the patients the process brought quite a few advantages. The principle “from patient mobility to data mobility” stands for more continuity in monitoring of health data along with fewer required visits to the doctor. The physicians speak of efficient treatments due to insights into the available longterm vital data. Saving time while maintaining a high level of quality care is a core result of the study. Moreover, patients gain improved knowledge and thus a better understanding of their individual health and disease process.

Contact

If you have any questions about one of our projects or the research group “Digital Practice”, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Dr. Olaf Gaus

Senior Science Manager,
Managing Director of DMGD

+49 271 740-4988

Weidenauer Straße 167,
DE-57076 Siegen

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